Best of NRF 2017: Top 10 Takeaways


Had-to-See Booths

  • Samsung had a slew of new hardware and software on display including beacon technology; intelligent signage that recognizes individual shoppers and tailors content to personal preferences; face recognition tech; and much more. The solution provider also highlighted its next-gen wearable devices including a miniature scanner that is mounted on a glove allowing associates to scan products seamlessly and quickly; and the Samsung Gear S3 smartwatch which features a larger display perfect for employee task management.
  • Intel’s booth was streaming with attendees from the minute the show floor opened in the morning to when it closed in the evening. Among the innovations on display was its new Pepsi vending machine that can self-diagnose potential service problems allowing operators to handle easy-to-fix problems without summoning a service tech. When a technician is necessary, however, he/she will come equipped with the necessary parts to fix the machine thanks to the info collected and distributed by the vending machine.
  • Google made its debut on the Big Show floor. While the tech giant has been on display at NRF before in partner booths, 2017 marked the first time Google had its own branded booth. Among the highlights of the Google booth was its facial recognition technology that is able to not only recognize individual shoppers, but pinpoint their particular mood and opinions on products.
  • Impinj’s booth was filled with next-gen RFID use cases, including its innovative changing room solution. When a RFID tagged item is brought into a fitting room a smart screen recognizes the item and allows the shopper to request different sizes, colors or complimentary products be brought to the room. In addition, the solution collects and analyses shopper behavior and provides retailers with invaluable feedback on disregarded items, which can be leveraged to improved conversion and merchandising efforts.
  • IBM’s booth was so packed this year there seemed to be no time when there weren’t concert-sized crowds on its floor. The company showcased its real-time personalization with IBM Watson, which is able to take unstructured “dark data” and make it usable. IBM showcased how when marketing, digital commerce, store engagement, and fulfillment work together instead of in silos, you get a true unified view.
  • LNL Systems showcased its FlorLink SmartHub, which activates the Internet of Things on a FlorComm Smart Sales Floor. The technology transforms alerts from in-store sensors and online orders into actionable messages for store employees and analytical data for executives.
  • Tyco Retail Solutions unveiled its portfolio of IoT-enabled solutions providing real-time in-store visibility and predictive analytics. Tyco’s IoT ecosystem includes RFID technology, sensors, security systems, video analytics, device management, and managed services. Among the highlights, the company demonstrated the K3 robot from Knightscope along with RAIN RFID sensors, automating inventory cycle counting using RFID technology, as well as a storefront interactive display with interactive capabilities. The customized display is based upon shopper gender and age demographics and provides a unique shopping experience as customers enter the store.
  • JDA is developing an Innovation as a Service model where retail clients pick out the service (say BOPIS) and JDA will build out the technology for them.
  • Manthan has developed a natural language voice interface for its analytics platform that it will roll out later this year.
  • Kibo is going beyond segmented personalization and taking it to the next level of real-time individualization built on a micro-services based extensible architecture.
  • Oracle Retail 16 is a major departure for Oracle loaded with cloud services. mobile capabilities, and converged commerce functions.

Article originally posted on the Retail Info Systems News

LNL Systems showcased its FlorLink SmartHub, which activates the Internet of Things on a FlorComm Smart Sales Floor. The technology transforms alerts from in-store sensors and online orders into actionable messages for store employees and analytical data for executives.