Are You Collecting the Data Your Sales Associates Need?


Are You Collecting the Data Your Sales Associates Need?

We all know that, regardless of how accurate it is, data does not sell products—people do. Of course, that doesn’t mean data doesn’t play a crucial role in helping retailers understand customers, which helps those all-important salespeople sell more products.

In fact, big data analyses aggregate data from online shopping carts and wish lists, comments on social media, and in-store purchases to provide retailers with a wealth of customer information. A study conducted by IBM found that 62% of retailers report that the use of data and analytics is creating a competitive advantage for their organizations.

Let’s look at how a variety data sources can contribute to improved customer service and increased sales.

POS analytics. The most common use for this type of information is to evaluate the effectiveness of a promotion or sale. Did a particular campaign move the needle in terms of product sales? Does a certain discount level tend to bring in more buying customers?

Personalized offers. Knowing what customers have bought in the past, both in the store and online, provides nearly endless options in terms of targeted offers. You might invite customers to save on their favorite products, sample a new item in a category they typically buy from, or view a new product line they may be interested in based on their buying history. Offers can be sent to a customer’s email, mailed to their home or office, or sent to their smartphone’s lock screen when they enter the store.

Location-based notifications. Knowing a customer’s location within the store opens up another major avenue of communication. Perhaps an item a customer purchases regularly is on sale—just a few feet from where he or she is standing. Or maybe a new line of clothing from a designer the customer favors is displayed one aisle over.

Upsell opportunities. In some cases, understanding the buying habits of customers can help you pinpoint upsell opportunities. For example, perhaps most customers buying a bike bought not only a helmet, but also a tire pump, water bottle, and lightweight lock.

Finally, data from an in-store activity monitor like FlorData can help associates be aware of what customers are buying, what they’re looking at online but purchasing in store, what items they have questions on, and more. Associates are the ultimate sale makers—but that doesn’t mean they can’t use all the data they can get.

Big data for retail associates

study conducted by IBM found that 62% of retailers report that the use of data and analytics is creating a competitive advantage for their organizations.